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Comparison Image Analysis of The Falling Man Shot by Richard Drew and the Picture Taken by Asahi Shimbun Essay Example

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Comparison Image Analysis of The Falling Man Shot by Richard Drew and the Picture Taken by Asahi Shimbun

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Comparison Image Analysis of The Falling Man Shot by Richard Drew and the Picture Taken by Asahi Shimbun. The nature of these shots makes the context necessary for their full perception. However, “The Falling Man” seems harder for understanding without knowledge of the background, whereas the background of the second photo is more explicit: the viewer immediately perceives obvious circumstances in the form of ruined dwellings and general devastation. The first association that might come into the viewer’s mind while looking at the second photo is “disaster”: looking at the woman and the ruins, one might begin to speculate about her story and the circumstances that led her to that situation; but it is not the same as “The Falling Man”. Looking at the relatively small figure of a man soaring upside down backgrounded by some construction of metal, one is unlikely to associate this picture with disaster;

instead, one is more likely to think about mere suicide looking at this quite surrealistic image, if the context is unknown. However, the stories of both pictures are all about disaster and tragedy. “The Falling Man” was shot on September 11, 2001, when two hijacked planes rammed into the towers of the World Trade Center marking the rise of global terrorism. Countless records of those tragic events – the disaster caused by human beings – show overwhelming panic and despair in witnesses and victims of the terroristic attack. Countless lives were ruined at that day, and the world had proved to be rather vulnerable in the face of global terroristic threat. The fire spread further and thick smoke made it difficult to breathe. Many people either fell or made an inconceivable decision to jump as the fire ravaged the towers. Ten years later, when Shimbun captured the moment of despair, the disaster was caused by nature rather than by humans, yet it led to even greater destruction and casualties, as Japan suffered from several powerful aftershocks following the earthquake (Taylor). Therefore, both photos strike with their spontaneity and sheer vividness, as they contain no deliberate or fake elements. Comparison Image Analysis of The Falling Man Shot by Richard Drew and the Picture Taken by Asahi Shimbun.

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Work Cited

Taylor, Alan. Japan Earthquake: Rescue, Recovery, and Reaction, 2011. From: http://www.theatlantic.com/photo/2011/03/japan-earthquake-rescue-recovery-and-reaction/100024/
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