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Similarity and Group Performance

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The analysis of the problem begins by examining Bruce Tuckman, who formulated a group theory in 1965. Tuckman states that every group goes through four processes, called forming, storming, norming and performing.   When a group goes through the forming process, the group is formed for the first time and the members get oriented with one another.   Conflict emerges in the second process, which is known as storming. With norming, the group members get used to one another – their styles of communication, their quirks and foibles and their level of work ethic.   It is at this time that the group begins to become more cohesive and function better.   Performing is the next process, and this is where the newly-coherent group works on task and completes the work to which it was assigned (Tuckman & Jensen, 1977).   According to Oemig et al, the performing element is assisted by group awareness.

This is where every member of the group gets to know every other member of the group, including information about the other members’ goals, and this is how the group achieves efficiency peaks (Oemig et al. ).  Civettini (2007) emphasizes group member similarity – the more people within the group are similar, the less likely there will be conflict and more likely there will be a consensus within the group about how to accomplish certain tasks (Civettini, 2007, p.

264).   These theories implicate the performing aspect of Tuckman’ s theory. The analysis of the problem begins by examining Bruce Tuckman, who formulated a group theory in 1965. Tuckman states that every group goes through four processes, called forming, storming, norming and performing.   When a group goes through the forming process, the group is formed for the first time and the members get oriented with one another.   Conflict emerges in the second process, which is known as storming.

With norming, the group members get used to one another – their styles of communication, their quirks and foibles and their level of work ethic.   It is at this time that the group begins to become more cohesive and function better.   Performing is the next process, and this is where the newly-coherent group works on task and completes the work to which it was assigned (Tuckman & Jensen, 1977).   According to Oemig et al, the performing element is assisted by group awareness.

This is where every member of the group gets to know every other member of the group, including information about the other members’ goals, and this is how the group achieves efficiency peaks (Oemig et al. ).  Civettini (2007) emphasizes group member similarity – the more people within the group are similar, the less likely there will be conflict and more likely there will be a consensus within the group about how to accomplish certain tasks (Civettini, 2007, p.

264).   These theories implicate the performing aspect of Tuckman’ s theory. The storming aspect of Tuckman’ s theory has also the subject of academic study and debate – why do groups have conflict?   Rothwell (2008) states that groups have predictable emotions upon which group cohesiveness and functioning are based    (Rothwell et al. , 2008).   Wright (2010) states that groups go through emotional phases which impact the way the group members interact over a period of time. When the group is new, individuals may have anxieties and fears regarding the group.

They may fear group rejection, and this highlights the importance of leadership. It is up to the leader to help new group members assimilate.

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preview essay on Similarity and Group Performance
  • Pages: 13 (3250 words)
  • Document Type: Essay
  • Subject: Business
  • Level: Undergraduate
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